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News article by Dr Abhishek Katakwar published in Deccan Chronicle (Date 21 january 2018) Our complete gastrointestinal tract is lined with microbes collectively called the microbiome, which includes bacteria, fungi, and even viruses. Though it sounds weird and even unhealthy, gut bacteria perform many important functions in the body, including aiding the immune system, producing the feel-good brain chemical serotonin, making energy available to the body from the food we eat, and disposing of foreign substances and toxins, though we always have a mixture of good and bad bacteria, sometimes the bad guys get the upper hand, causing an imbalance in gut bacteria, and can cause severe health problems than just stomach pain, gas, bloating, or diarrhea. Because 60-80% of our immune system is located in our gut, gut imbalances have been linked to obesity, hormonal imbalances, autoimmune diseases, diabetes, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, anxiety, depression, eczema, and other chronic health problems. You will be surprised to know that human gastrointestinal microbiota is a complex ecosystem of approximately 300 to 500 bacterial species, comprising nearly 2 million genes (the microbiome). Indeed, the number of bacteria within the gut is approximately 10 times that of all of the cells in the human body. At birth, the entire intestinal tract is sterile; the infant’s gut is first colonized by maternal and environmental bacteria during birth and continues to be populated through feeding and other contacts. Factors known to influence colonization include gestational age, mode of delivery (vaginal birth vs assisted delivery), diet (breast milk vs formula), level of sanitation, and exposure to antibiotics. by the age of 2.5 years, the microbiota fully resembles the microbiota of an adult in terms of composition. In humans, the composition of the flora is influenced not only by age but also by diet and socioeconomic conditions. In a study published in 2012 in “Nature” (high indexed journal) the interaction of diet and age was demonstrated, firstly, by a close relationship between diet and microbiota composition in the subjects and, secondly, by interactions between diet, the microbiota, and health status. It also concluded that non-digestible or undigested components (Fibre) of the diet may contribute substantially to bacterial metabolism; for example, much of the increase in stool volume resulting from the ingestion of dietary fibre is based on an augmentation of bacterial mass. Most recently, qualitative changes in the microbiota have been invoked in the pathogenesis of a global epidemic: obesity. It has been postulated that a shift in the composition of the flora toward a population dominated by bacteria that are more avid extractors of absorbable nutrients, which are then available for assimilation by the host could play a major role in obesity. Also there are enough evidence to support the hypothesis that the endogenous intestinal microflora plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Inflammatory bowel diseases and its variants and related disorders. Most Western populations over-consume highly refined, omnivorous diets of poor nutritional quality. Those diets are energy dense, high in animal protein, total and saturated fats, and simple sugars but low in fruits, vegetables and other plant-based foods. Consequently, they are typically low in dietary fibre, non starch polysaccharides in general and resistant starch in particular. Cross-sectional studies have shown some evidence that Western-style diets are associated with gut microbial populations that are typified by a Bacteroides enterotype (bad gut bacteria) whereas traditional diets rich in plant polysaccharides are associated with a Prevotella enterotype (good gut bacteria). Obesity is associated with an increased fecal Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio relative to lean subjects. Replacing a habitual Western diet with one high in fiber elicited rapid (within 24 h) and marked alterations in fecal microbiota composition, although the changes were insufficient to produce a broad switch from Bacteroides to Prevotella enterotype.  One mechanism by which fiber promotes and maintains bowel health is through increasing digesta mass. Incompletely fermented fiber (e.g., insoluble non starch polysaccharides such as cellulose), increases digesta mass primarily through its physical presence and ability to adsorb water. An increase in digesta mass dilutes toxins, reduces intracolonic pressure, shortens transit time and increases defecation frequency. Fibers can also increase fecal mass to a lesser degree by stimulating fermentation, which leads to bacterial proliferation and increased biomass. Prebiotics are dietary substrates that selectively promote proliferation and/or activity of “beneficial” bacteria indigenous to the colon. The concept, first published by Gibson and Roberfroid in 1995, has been refined and redefined on several occasions. Prebiotics are defined currently as “selectively fermented ingredients that result in specific changes, in the composition and/or activity in the GI microbiota, thus conferring benefit(s) upon host health”. Dr Abhishek katakwar, Bariatric & amp; Metabolic surgeon from Asian Institute of Gastroenterology quote “Your body is a Temple. You are what you eat. Do not eat processed food, junk foods, filth, or disease carrying food, animals, or rodents. Some people say of these foods, ‘well, it tastes good;. Most of the foods today that statically cause sickness, cancer, and disease all taste good;s well seasoned and prepared poison. This is why so many people are sick; mentally, emotionally, physically, and spiritually; because of being hooked to poison, instead of being hooked on the truth and to real foods that heal and provide you with good health and wellness.
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It was a usual Sunday morning; I was back home just after finishing my long cycling ride along hussainsagar and grabbed my freshly prepared ginger lemon tea. Like many i scrolled through my daily newspaper “Telemarketing of India”, I have given this name to one of the highest distributed newspaper because their 80% content is advertorial and remaining is news including few pictorial erotic stories of some detectives (this is what they are feeding to the biggest republic population). Coming to the point what grabbed my attention was two front full page advertisement of an energy bar (to me it’s just another sugar candy). To be honest I have tried them lately and they are really awesome and addictive and doesn't cost much to pocket. It made me think about their business strategy and huge amount they spend on marketing, so I decided to make some research on the facts behind huge chocolate industry. End results of which were more shocking than surprising, hence I decided to share it with world. So here is “bitter truth about chocolates”. 1. You are eating lead: Wooooooo surprised to hear that, you must be wondering when most of the countries have banned leaded petrol how come its being consumed through chocolates. Well, it just so happens that the shells of cocoa beans, the chief ingredient in chocolate, have an almost supernatural ability to absorb lead from the air. Of course, this is only a big deal if there's a lot of lead in the air, right? Sure, which is why it's unfortunate that Nigeria , where a shitload of our cocoa comes from, still has lead in their gasoline. That's why a Hershey bar tastes so damn good: The secret ingredient is African exhaust. Kids absorb higher concentrations of lead into their system than the rest of us, just through their day to day activities of eating dirt and inhaling paint chips. Also, they breathe faster than an adult, which further draws in whatever lead happens to be floating around and sends it toward their sensitive little brains. Even before they start wailing on that candy, they have more lead in their bodies than Vito Corleone. Then comes Halloween and Christmas and then new year and story continues. 2. Ridiculous Lies About Health Benefits While it may not surprise you that much that Big Chocolate, like any "Big" industry, doesn't give a crap about your welfare, the lengths these companies go to step over your bloated, greasy corpse to raid your wallet rank with some of the stupidest and most nefarious in the business world. Milton Hershey, for instance, often claimed that "an ounce of chocolate provided more energy than a pound of meat." He even made a wrapper for his bar stating it. Mars made a pamphlet instead that claimed eating chocolate every day was about as good as eating an apple a day. What do you think is the biggest chocolate company in the world? Hershey, right? Wrong. Mars, Inc. is four times the size of Hershey (they make the Milky Way, Snickers, Mars Bar, plus countless other products). And they got there via pure insanity. 3. It’s all about business The global chocolate industry in 2010 made $83.2 billion, $20 billion of this coming from the United States and Each year, 600, 000 tonnes of cocoa beans are consumed globally. 72% of cocoa beans come from Ivory Coast and Ghana. Other producers of cocoa beans are Indonesia, Cameroon, Nigeria, and Brazil. A 2001 survey of chocolate companies in the United States, which includes Hershey’s and Mars, both use “large amounts” of Ivory Coast cocoa beans. As there are 600, 000 cocoa farms in the Ivory Coast (40 % supplier), it is not definitive, but very likely, that cocoa products from these companies are harvested by child slave labour. US State Department estimates number of child labourer could be 109, 000. 4. Facts · The WHO recommends no more than 6 teaspoons of added sugar per day. A food is considered high in sugar if it contains more than 15g of total sugars per 100g. A food is considered low in sugar if it contains 5g of total sugars per 100g. Read the nutrition label, look for ‘Carbohydrates of which sugars’ and at how many grams of sugar per portion/bar/biscuit/pot. Each 4 grams of sugar is equal to 1 teaspoon. Sugar Content of Common Foods Bottle of coke 500ml – 10.5 tsp sugar Snickers Bar – 7 tsp sugar Bowl of crunchy nut cornflakes – 4 tsp sugar Tablespoon ketchup – 1 tsp sugar Glass orange juice (150ml) – 2.5 tsp sugar Can red bull – 6 tsp sugar Kelloggs Nutri Grain bar – 3 tsp sugar Dr Abhishek katakwar is a fitness enthusiast, life style advisor, obesity expert and bariatric and metabolic surgeon at Asian institute of gastroenterology, Hyderabad. Email:abhishekkatakwar@gmail.com cell:8087358725 For more info visit us at http://drabhishekkatakwar.com/bizFloat/5a151fffa677470a7cc3118d/It-was-a-usual-Sunday-morning-I-was-back-home-just-after-finishing-my-long-cycling-ride-along-hussainsagar-and-grabbed-my-freshly-prepared-ginger-lemon-tea-Like-many-i-scrolled-through-my-daily-newspaper-Te
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It was a usual Sunday morning; I was back home just after finishing my long cycling ride along hussainsagar and grabbed my freshly prepared ginger lemon tea. Like many i scrolled through my daily newspaper “Telemarketing of India”, I have given this name to one of the highest distributed newspaper because their 80% content is advertorial and remaining is news including few pictorial erotic stories of some detectives (this is what they are feeding to the biggest republic population). Coming to the point what grabbed my attention was two front full page advertisement of an energy bar (to me it’s just another sugar candy). To be honest I have tried them lately and they are really awesome and addictive and doesn't cost much to pocket. It made me think about their business strategy and huge amount they spend on marketing, so I decided to make some research on the facts behind huge chocolate industry. End results of which were more shocking than surprising, hence I decided to share it with world. So here is “bitter truth about chocolates”. 1. You are eating lead: Wooooooo surprised to hear that, you must be wondering when most of the countries have banned leaded petrol how come its being consumed through chocolates. Well, it just so happens that the shells of cocoa beans, the chief ingredient in chocolate, have an almost supernatural ability to absorb lead from the air. Of course, this is only a big deal if there's a lot of lead in the air, right? Sure, which is why it's unfortunate that Nigeria , where a shitload of our cocoa comes from, still has lead in their gasoline. That's why a Hershey bar tastes so damn good: The secret ingredient is African exhaust. Kids absorb higher concentrations of lead into their system than the rest of us, just through their day to day activities of eating dirt and inhaling paint chips. Also, they breathe faster than an adult, which further draws in whatever lead happens to be floating around and sends it toward their sensitive little brains. Even before they start wailing on that candy, they have more lead in their bodies than Vito Corleone. Then comes Halloween and Christmas and then new year and story continues. 2. Ridiculous Lies About Health Benefits While it may not surprise you that much that Big Chocolate, like any "Big" industry, doesn't give a crap about your welfare, the lengths these companies go to step over your bloated, greasy corpse to raid your wallet rank with some of the stupidest and most nefarious in the business world. Milton Hershey, for instance, often claimed that "an ounce of chocolate provided more energy than a pound of meat." He even made a wrapper for his bar stating it. Mars made a pamphlet instead that claimed eating chocolate every day was about as good as eating an apple a day. What do you think is the biggest chocolate company in the world? Hershey, right? Wrong. Mars, Inc. is four times the size of Hershey (they make the Milky Way, Snickers, Mars Bar, plus countless other products). And they got there via pure insanity. 3. It’s all about business The global chocolate industry in 2010 made $83.2 billion, $20 billion of this coming from the United States and Each year, 600,000 tonnes of cocoa beans are consumed globally. 72% of cocoa beans come from Ivory Coast and Ghana. Other producers of cocoa beans are Indonesia, Cameroon, Nigeria, and Brazil. A 2001 survey of chocolate companies in the United States, which includes Hershey’s and Mars, both use “large amounts” of Ivory Coast cocoa beans. As there are 600,000 cocoa farms in the Ivory Coast (40 % supplier), it is not definitive, but very likely, that cocoa products from these companies are harvested by child slave labour. US State Department estimates number of child labourer could be 109,000. 4. Facts · The WHO recommends no more than 6 teaspoons of added sugar per day. A food is considered high in sugar if it contains more than 15g of total sugars per 100g. A food is considered low in sugar if it contains 5g of total sugars per 100g. Read the nutrition label, look for ‘Carbohydrates of which sugars’ and at how many grams of sugar per portion/bar/biscuit/pot. Each 4 grams of sugar is equal to 1 teaspoon. Sugar Content of Common Foods Bottle of coke 500ml – 10.5 tsp sugar Snickers Bar – 7 tsp sugar Bowl of crunchy nut cornflakes – 4 tsp sugar Tablespoon ketchup – 1 tsp sugar Glass orange juice (150ml) – 2.5 tsp sugar Can red bull – 6 tsp sugar Kelloggs Nutri Grain bar – 3 tsp sugar Dr Abhishek katakwar is a fitness enthusiast, life style advisor, obesity expert and bariatric and metabolic surgeon at Asian institute of gastroenterology, Hyderabad. Email:abhishekkatakwar@gmail.com cell:8087358725
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Q1. How are work stress and food eating habits related? What happens in the body due to stress, which makes a person eat more food?  While short-term stress can cause a person to lose their appetite, chronic stress can have the opposite effect. Ever notice that when you're really stressed, you tend to crave comfort foods that are high in fat or sugar? Researchers have found that specific hormones may play a role in this process. When you eat carbohydrates, it raises the body's serotonin’s level, “Serotonin” is the body's feel-good chemical. Chronic stress can cause the body to release excess “cortisol”, a hormone critical in managing fat storage and energy use in the human body. Cortisol is known to increase appetite and may encourage cravings for sugary or fatty foods. More recent studies also suggest hormone called “Neuropeptide-Y” that is released from nerve cells during stress and encourages fat accumulation. A diet high in fat and sugar appears to further promote the release of neuropeptide Y. q2. What are the kind of foods that people are found to eat and why? Is it out of necessity, taste buds or habit?  Not surprisingly, people under stress don't tend to make smart food choices. Very often the carbohydrates that people go for are laden with fat, like muffins, pastries, doughnuts, and cookies, which are easily available at workplace. When individuals get stressed, they often act in impulsive ways because they do not know how to transform the stress into something productive. For people diagnosed with an eating disorder, these impulses from environmental and social stressors can cause individuals to not eat enough food, purge after a meal, or engage in a binge-eating episode. Sometimes It's a very high-pressure environment at workplace says Dr Abhishek katakwar. "For a lot of new software or IT recruits, it's their first time being away from home, so that can contribute to stress, and also the work performance and social pressures. All those things compound to lead to some unhealthy behaviours, whether it's full-blown eating disorders or disordered eating." q3. Is there evidence suggesting that overweight and obesity is due to work related stress. If so, what are the changes that the management needs to opt for and what does the employee need to do - do destress and bring their life on track.  According to a new study from the Montreal, office-workers have become less active over the last three decades and this decreased activity may partly explain the rise in obesity. "People eat better and exercise more today than they did in the 1970's, yet obesity rates continue to rise, " "My hypothesis is that our professional life is linked to this seemingly contradictory phenomenon." Also nightshift work is associated with a 29% increased risk of becoming obese or overweight. The findings, which are published in Obesity Reviews, suggest that modifying working schedules to avoid prolonged exposure to long-term night shift work might help reduce the risk of obesity. q4. What are the behavioural changes that they must opt for? And how do deadline based, emergency based jobs make a person opt for these changes?  Effective programs take a multidisciplinary approach that focuses on providing workers with the knowledge, skills, and support to eat a healthier diet and be more active. This can include nutrition classes, onsite exercise facilities and changing rooms, access to nutritionists and other counsellors, and worksite or company-wide policies that provide healthier food options and reimburse exercise-related expenses. q5. What are best methods to opt for during these conditions? What can be done in terms of behaviour change and also change in eating habit.?  In the movie Die Hard, Bruce Willis once said: “If you’re not a part of the solution than you’re part of the problem”. Unless you are currently underemployed, retired, or too young to be employed, you typically will spend at least a third of your time at your workplace. That means your workplace governs a large part of what you eat and drink and how much physical activity you have. For example, you may have heard the saying that “sitting is the new smoking”. Answer to this stress is practicing relaxation techniques like yoga or tai chi, meditation, muscle relaxation to help relieve stress, enjoy nature, get out of the cocoon and connect with world. Dr Abhishek Katakwar Bariatric and Metabolic surgeon Lifestyle expert and motivational speaker Asian Institute of Gastroenterology, Hyderabad abhishekkatakwar@gmail.com Cell: +91-8087358725
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Simple Sugars vs. Complex Carbs Many people seeking a positive health and fitness change are very confused about the differences between simple and complex carbohydrates. And to make matters worse, many of the popular weight-loss solutions seem to do all they can to cloud the waters even further. My goal here is to help you understand the difference between the simple and complex carbohydrates, show you how they impact your health and fitness, and provide you with some simple steps you can take – today – to move you closer to becoming your own fitness champion. After reading this information, you will be one critical step closer toward reaching your absolute physical best! Carbohydrates are one of three necessary macro-nutrients that provide calories in our diets. The other two are protein and fat. Carbohydrates provide most of the energy needed in our daily lives, both for normal body functions (such as heartbeat, breathing, digestion, and brain activity) and for exercise (like biking, walking, running up the stairs and all types of resistance training). An ample supply of carbohydrates is absolutely necessary to sustain a healthy existence and a must if your goal is to reduce your body fat and enhance your fitness level. Carbohydrates are considered simple or complex based upon their chemical structure. Both types contain four calories per gram, and both are digested into the bloodstream as glucose, which is then used to fuel our bodies for normal daily activity and exercise. The main difference between simple and complex carbs is: Simple carbohydrates or simple sugars - These carbs are broken down and digested very quickly, but most simple carbs contain refined sugars and very few essential vitamins and minerals. Examples include table sugar, fruit juice, milk, yogurt, honey, molasses, maple syrup and brown sugar. Complex carbohydrates - the complex carbs take longer to digest and are packed with fiber, vitamins and minerals. Examples include vegetables, whole grain breads, oatmeal, legumes, brown rice and wheat pasta. When you eat (or drink) a simple carbohydrate or a simple sugar – whether it is a can of soda, a scoop of fat-free ice cream, or even a glass of orange juice – all of the ingested sugar quickly rushes into your bloodstream. You typically feel a quick rush of energy. Your body then promptly reacts to this sudden spike in blood sugar by calling on the pancreas to produce additional insulin to remove the excess sugar from your blood. And for the moment, you have significantly lower blood sugar as a result of the insulin doing its job, resulting in a sense or feeling of needing more fuel, more energy and more calories. And as you hit that residual low blood sugar, you begin to crave more of the quick-release, simple sugars, and hence you have just initiated the sugar craving cycle. As this downward cycle continues, your pancreas continues to secrete insulin while it simultaneously reduces its production of another hormone called glucagon. Glucagon production, as it relates to improving your body composition, is very important if your fitness goal is to lose excess body fat. Glucagon is the only hormone that allows stored body fat to be released into the bloodstream to be burned by your muscles as energy. And when the pancreas has to elevate its production of insulin while reducing its supply of glucagon, you are basically locking-in your excess body fat. Therefore, too much simple sugar intake dramatically hinders the process of reducing stored body fat. American’s consumption of sugar continues to rise year after year. So too, does obesity in our country. In my opinion, the correlation between increased sugar consumption and obesity is telling. When 16-20 percent of daily calorie intake is coming from sugar, Americans are not only locking in stored body fat, but also squeezing out the healthier, more supportive and nutrient-dense food choices. Sugar is the enemy of body fat reduction; and the enemy of a healthy, high energy lifestyle. So, do your best to begin to understand what’s in the food you are consuming and reduce those that contain more than a few grams of sugar. When searching out the food choices that include simple carbs (i.e., sugars), start by looking for obvious ingredients on food labels that actually use the word “sugar”, like brown sugar, sugar cane, and of course, just simple sugar. Also, reduce your intake of foods that have any form of “syrup” in their ingredients. For example, corn syrup, high-fructose corn syrup, maple syrup and glucose syrup. And finally, look for those ingredients that end in “–ose”, like sucrose, glucose, lactose and fructose. All of these ingredients are sugars and, if ingested, will spike your blood sugar and initiate the pancreas to produce insulin and essentially shut off glucagon production – the fat release hormone. If you find yourself in a situation where you are limited in your food choices (e.g., a breakfast or luncheon business meeting, traveling, dinner parties, etc.), and sugar seems to be the predominant choice, try to eat a protein with the sugar. Protein will help to slow down sugar’s release into the bloodstream, and reduce the insulin/glucagon effect. Complex carbohydrates, on the other hand – and despite all the negative press they receive in some of the popular weight loss books – are actually your body’s preferred source of energy. When you consume the healthy complex carbs – the ones that have not been altered in a food laboratory – they are broken down into glucose molecules and used as fuel or stored in muscle and the liver as glycogen. When the body has an ample supply of glucose fuel and glycogen fuel storage, it can run efficiently. You will then have the energy to function at your best and provided the material that your body needs to reduce body fat and reach your health and fitness goals. When you look for complex carbohydrate food choices to put into your body, seek out two subgroups of carbohydrates…starchy carbohydrates and fibrous carbohydrates. Starchy carbohydrates include food choices such as brown rice, baked and sweet potatoes, oatmeal, brown pastas and whole grains. Fibrous carbohydrates include asparagus, broccoli, cauliflower, onions, mushrooms, spinach and peppers and can also be found in most varieties of dark green leafy vegetables. One more very important nugget of carbohydrate information to remember: Do your best to seek out the complex carbohydrates that have not been processed in a food factory. When shopping at the grocery store, stay away from the carbs that include the following words in their ingredients: bleached, enriched, processed or refined. These processed and altered foods are void of critical nutrient value and will do very little to fuel and energize your body. Bottom line, the goal in consuming carbohydrates should be to reduce or eliminate simple sugars and instead focus on the complex carbohydrates – both the starchy and fibrous complex carbs – those that have not been processed or refined. Do the best you can. At first, it may seem challenging as you begin to uncover the foods that contain sugar, eliminate them and seek out the more supportive carbohydrates. But once you get into the habit of eating the fibrous and starchy carbohydrates, eventually it will become a way of life for you. I can promise you, after an initial effort, the payoff of eliminating sugar from your diet can be dramatic. Your energy level will soar. You will lose stubborn body fat. And your craving for sugar will completely dissipate. To wrap up this extremely important section, let me share the same simple steps with you that I share with my friends who are striving for their absolute physical best: 1.Start to put the good carbs into your body: Complex Starchy and Fibrous Carbs that have not been altered or processed. 2.Eat small meals more frequently – every 3-3½ hours, 5-6 times per day. 3.Begin to gain an awareness of food labels and the “sugar” ingredients. 4, Start to reduce or eliminate the simple sugars and the processed carbohydrates. Remember: If your goal is fat reduction, sugar is your worst enemy! 5.Focus on making progress and forget about being perfect. You’ll mess up every so often. Forgive yourself and just move on! 6.Remember that small changes over time will stack up on themselves…and eventually will bring you to a new destination of physical excellence! #obesity #diabetes #bariatric #Metabolic #surgery
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